How many lies are Smed and company going to tell before they all finally cash out?

February 21, 2015

The slow and public execution of EQN continues.

But don’t worry, dumping the software to help you make “strong AI” doesn’t mean you aren’t committed to “strong AI” huh?

What’s next, firing the art team but reassuring all the fans that EQN is still going to be gorgeous? Maybe taking the entire sound department out to the parking lot and returning to confirm that EQN is going to sound amazing?

Keep doing you Smed, keep doing you.


CoC: Sixlines pre-war

February 19, 2015

(Stats and writeup by Delpez)

Last time we met these guys the clans were well matched, and the result was our first draw. It looks like they’ve progressed much faster than us, because this is a mismatch comparable to the Mexico 2.0 war. As always, here’s a breakdown of clan strength based on TH and experience level. I’ve included Mexico 2.0 as a reference.

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FFXIV: People are nice due to design

February 19, 2015

I haven’t done an update post about FFXIV since our return, in part because I wasn’t sure what to write beyond “Playing FFXIV again, still the best themepark out, still has that WoW-vanilla-but-in-2015 feel”, but this post from Loire is a good jump-off point. Go give it a read, including the comments section.

The answer to why FFXIV has such a great community (and it absolutely does) is a large mix of factors, but I do believe the most important or dominant factor is the slower combat; WoW-kiddies and others with that mentality get turned off by it, which helps to filter them out of the game. Related to the slower combat is the need to spend mana or other such resources carefully (ala vanilla WoW) rather than just having basically an unlimited pool like in current-day WoW (so I’ve heard), so having to actually think (not being ‘accessible’) during combat is too much of a barrier for some.

Another large factor is the focus that FFXIV has. It’s not a ‘be all to everyone’ MMO. It owns the fact that it’s a PvE themepark. That’s what the game does, and each update is focused on making that aspect better rather than ‘expanding’ the game in random directions (PvP, unrelated mini-games, side-show mobile-like stuff). This again is important because it not only filters out everyone not interested in being part of a PvE themepark, but it also retains those who do want that, which is just as important. Having a solid core of veteran players is critical for an MMO, and you can’t achieve that core if your MMO only lasts for a month or two per content cycle.

In addition to those two, there are a large number of smaller but also important design decisions to keep the game worldly and active. In FFXIV you don’t progress through zones as much as in other games; you often have a lot of reasons to return to a zone, which in turn means lots of zones feel ‘alive’ with activity, rather than being consumed by a locust swarm of players before being abandoned and forgotten.

Having one character that can switch quickly into an ‘alt’ class is huge as well for all of this, in addition to keeping you online with your one identifiable character that draws you into more social opportunities. That both crafting and gathering is done as a class with its own level and gear, rather than just a skill bar that goes up, further drives this design angle home.

FFXIV being a massive success is also great news for the genre, because the game is yet another example that if you make a quality MMO that has a focus and sticks to that focus, you can attract and retain a large audience. You don’t need to dumb down or make things ‘accessibly’ to draw in millions, and if you continue to deliver quality updates, you continue to justify charging a sub for that content. In many ways, FFXIV is a reminder of how the genre works when you are able to make a quality product, rather than an average-or-worst product that then relies on its business model to separate fools from their money for as long as the smoke show can be maintained.


Games Workshop hates money, and me

February 18, 2015

I recently tried the Warhammer conversion mod Warsword for Mount and Blade, and it was a pretty wild 24 hours in my brain. Right after installing it I got that amazing rush of “omg this is going to be awesome” that not only Warband provides (btw, I think Warband has crept up into ‘best game ever’ territory for me), but here I had Warband AND the Warhammer IP (which IMO is the greatest fantasy IP out, miles ahead of LotR or Game of Thrones).

Some high points: The major races are represented and actually look decent. Lizardmen look like Lizardmen, Orcs are bigger greener humans, ogres are huge, and goblins/dwarves are actually small. I didn’t think that was possible in Warband. Races also have race-specific gear, so you can’t put undead armor on a human, or have a non-goblin ride a wolf mount. That’s a cool touch. It’s especially cool because the various companions you can recruit are from all the different races, so you need to travel around, fight different races, and visit different racial cities to gear them up.

The stuff the mod does clearly pushes the aged engine to its limits, from the size of the map to the units and armor skins. And as I got further into it, the rough state of the mod (in forever beta) hit me again and again. Script errors were common, and I have a strange and game-breaking bug where the factions eventually all declare peace with each other and never go to war. That, along with other issues, is why I can’t recommend the mod, and why the situation drives me nuts.

Games Workshop, the owners of the Warhammer IP, must hate money. They must be allergic to it. Because how in the holy hell do we not have a Warband-like game using the Warhammer IP? Everything, literally everything, about the IP is perfect for a game of that style, and the amount of DLC you could sell (factions, unique heroes, item packs, unit skins) would be insane. And assuming the game was Warband-like in quality, I’d buy it all up. Every $5 unit skin, every $5 item back, every faction for $20. All of it. If you told me tomorrow someone was releasing a fully working, cleaned up, bug-free version of that mod for $200, I’d drive the money over personally.

I understand why GamesWorkshop won’t release a turn-based, straight up copy of the tabletop game in digital form ala Bloodbowl; even if the game was sold for $50, that’s the cost of one larger figuring, so you don’t want to cut into those sales (Bloodbowl is discontinued in figurine form). I get it. It blows, but I get it. But would a more real-time game like a Warband hurt figurine sales? Because that’s the only reason I can think of why this hasn’t happened already. That or again, a pure hatred for making money.

Need to stop typing now because thinking more and more about this is really getting under my skin.


Great interview about indie gaming

February 18, 2015

VentureBeat has an excellent interview with Jeff Vogel, the creator of Avernum and other indie RPG games. Very much worth your time.

H/t to Armagon for the link


Quick thought about the next Fallout game

February 16, 2015

The next Fallout game from Bethesda will hopefully be a two-to-five hour, linear, on-rails ‘aim for you’ shooter with a bit of story, but most of the story will be comic relief rather than a more series take on a post-apocalyptic world.

Wait Blizzard isn’t making the next Fallout? It’s still Bethesda so I don’t have to massively lower my expectation and will still likely get a game that reflects previous quality deliveries from the studio? Sweet.


CoC: Supreme Cream vs Mexico 2.0 2/13/2015

February 14, 2015

(Stats and writeup by Delpez)

Supreme Cream! vs. Mexico 2.0

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